Creating High Contrast Landscapes Images Using Photoshop


In this post, I am going to demonstrate how to bring out detail in landscape photos using traditional/legacy commands in Photoshop.

In more recent versions of Photoshop, we have new commands such as Clarity and Texture that essentially do this. But sometimes it is fun to revert to the old way. Besides, there is always that potential to better control the final result.

In this demo, I will be using Photoshop 2020, but the same techniques can be used using Photoshop Elements as well. I learned this technique from Dave Seeram in a magazine article he wrote several years ago.

Click on the figure below to view the tutorial.

hi contrast

If you found this AppTip Sheet to be helpful, please give it a star rating, or click on the Like or Share buttons at the bottom.

Until next time…

Using Photoshop CC’s Color Range to Make a Selection


Well now that the Holidays have been over for a few weeks, I should post another AppTip Sheet. The Color Range command is often used to change the color of a garment or other object in a photo.

This tip is how to use Photoshop CC’s Color Range command to select the sky or other background to enhance it in some way. Although this example does not deal with this tip of image, the technique is often used to enhance or replace the sky shining through tree branches, which often present a significant challenge using other selection techniques.

Click on the figure below to view or download the AppTip Sheet.

2020-01-24_11-09-21

If you found this AppTip Sheet helpful, please Share it and/or give it a Like below.

Until next time…

Editing Video in Photoshop ACR Revisited – Once Again


Colin Smith of Photoshop Café recently described how to edit and color grade video in Photoshop CC.

The steps on color grading were new to me, but it turns out I had posted two articles sometime ago on how to edit video using ACR in Photoshop.

The first one was in 2014. I am not sure where I leaned how to do this, but it could have been from Colin Smith. Here is its link:

https://don26812.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/use-adobe-camera-raw-to-edit-video/

I revisited the subject in December 2016. This time my before and after comparison was better. Here is the link to this one.

https://don26812.wordpress.com/2016/12/16/revisiting-processing-video-using-adobe-camera-raw-acr-in-photoshop/

In the Colin Smith’s recent video, he goes on to how to use ACR to color grade a video, and give it a cinematic effect with is popular. Personally, I do not like the look for most of my videos.

By the way, I find that Photoshop renders the video much more slowly than say Premiere Elements 2019, at least on my PC. But I can live with that, because I am much more comfortable using the sliders of the ACR.

After all this time, I am curious to see if others use this technique to edit their videos.

And finally, there are a lot of other things you can do to enhance your videos using Photoshop CC, like trimming, and adding transitions.

Until next time…

Using Photoshop CC to Prepare a Panosphere for Display on Okolo.com


Back in February, I posted an article how I use Okolo.com to display a panosphere. Okolo stitches the uploaded images into a 360-degree panorama or panosphere. In this post, I expand a bit on the earlier one. Okolo does not accept RAW images, which I prefer to take when using its panorama shooting modes. It only accepts JPEG images, and they can only be 5 Mb in size. So other software must be used to edit the RAW images, and then convert and resize them.

This post illustrates my workflow for preparing the 34 RAW images my DJI Mavic Pro takes using Photoshop CC. It goes no to outline the steps to upload them to Okolo.com to create and display the panosphere. I have detailed the steps in the PDF file that is linked below.

2018-12-13_19-34-22

Using PS CC and Okolo to Display 360 Panosphere

The workflow I describe here uses PS CC Action that does the necessary steps to convert and resize each image automatically. It is a simple action, and for the purposes of this post, I have not covered how to write it.

Finally, this can also be done in Photoshop Elements. I will probably write another post soon to better illustrate how to do it with the capabilities that are in Elements. Stay tuned.

If you found this tutorial to be helpful, please star-rate and Like it. And of course, any and all comments are welcome.

Colin Smith on Curves


From time to time, I like to point out a tutorial written by someone else that I personally found to be helpful. This is one of those times.

Colin Smith of Photoshop Café has written may tutorials, as well as produced a large number of videos on both Photoshop and flying drones. They are all quite good.  In this video tutorial, he provides a thorough review of Curves in Photoshop. You may find it useful as simply a review, but I bet you will learn something you did not know or have long since forgotten. I know I did.

Until next time.

Tweak Your Colors With Photoshop’s Selective Color Command


In this post, I want to highlight a technique to selectively adjust color in your images. There are many ways to do this. This technique does require using Photoshop CC or an earlier version of the program. Photoshop Elements does not have the command, Selective Color, that this technique uses.

I learned about this technique from a video tutorial by Blake Rudis of F.64 Academy. The link to the video is shown below. He also provides free Actions that automate using the technique on three different style of photos.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rzdEfrmdMwc

In Photoshop Elements, the closest you can come to the Selective Color command, is using the Hue/Saturation command, and selecting individual color channels, rather than just using the Master Channel. But as Rudis points out in the video, this is not the same as the Selective Color approach.

Additionally, the technique can be used to provide subtle changes, as well as more pronounced changes to a photo, as is illustrated in the comparison below. It is normally applied after the primary adjustments to brightness, contrast, and color have been applied to the image.

Sel Color Before After

So, if you have Photoshop, give this technique a try, let me know what you think, and post a link to your image here.

Until next time…

Real Easy Technique for Better Sunsets


On a recent cruise, I took dozens of sunsets. Most of them were not what I was looking for. I either ended up with a blown out sun, or the picture was too dark for my liking.

Today, I received an email from Steve Arnold of Post Processing Mastery that should a very easy technique to tone down an over exposed sun. Although he explains how to do it using Photoshop, it is well in the capabilities of Photoshop Elements.

Below shows the results I obtained on one of my sunset images.

Brush Sunset Tech

The Before is on the right, and the After is on the left. Some sunset images will respond better than others to this technique. And remember, you can tweak the result by adjusting the brush layer’s Opacity.

Here is the link to the video that explains the technique.

http://dons.creativetips.ppmastery.com/sunblur

Until next time.