Removing Unwanted Objects in Your Photos Using Photoshop Elements 15


It has been far too long since I posted my last Photoshop Elements 15 tutorial. During the past month I have spent a lot of time traveling to softball diamonds and soccer fields to watch my two granddaughters compete in their respective sports. So before the next tournament comes up, I want to post at least one.

In this tutorial, I cover the Clone Stamp tool, the Healing Brush, and the Spot Healing Brush. The Clone Stamp has been around forever, and the healing brushes were added some time after that. More recent versions of Elements added Content Aware technology to the healing brushes. In many cases this technology can significantly improve the results. However, I have to admit there are times when I revert back to the traditional Clone Stamp Tool to complete the task.

As usual the written tutorial is provided in PDF format that is easy to download and print. The figure below shows the before image and the initial application of the Clone Stamp for the example used in the tutorial. Click on it to read or download the tutorial.

Before After Cloning

If you found this tutorial helpful, please star-rate it and share it on social media. Thanks for stopping by, and I’ll be back soon with another post.

Until next time…

Rescaling vs. Re-Sampling Photos and Why it Matters


The subject of resizing your photographs to make a high quality print or to share it online continues to be question that comes up in forums. Part of the confusion stems from the terminology itself. In this post/post, I will discuss the subject from the standpoint of scanning a negative or slide. First, Are a couple of comments about the terminology.

Resolution – Dots Per Inch

Resolution is generally referred to as either dots per inch (dpi) or pixels per inch (ppi). What can lead to confusion is that dpi is used to describe the resolution of a scanner. For example, a scanner that is capable of scanning 35 mm negatives may have a optical resolution of 3200 dpi or greater. The word optical here means there are no mathematics being used to artificially increase the resolution. For the best quality, you should scan at or below the optical resolution of the scanner.

Resolution – Pixels Per Inch

Referring to a scanned image, once you open the image in say, Photoshop Elements or Photoshop, the terminology changes. Now the same resolution is measured in and referred to pixels per inch (ppi). The resolution is the same as you scanned, the term just changes. For example, if a negative is scanned at 3200 dpi and then opened in PSE 15 using the Image > Resize > Image Size command, the dialog below is opened. The resolution of 3200 ppi is shown.

3200 ppi ex

Print Resolution – Dots per Inch

When describing the resolution of an inkjet printer, dots per inch or dpi is again used. However, at this point in the process, the term takes on a whole new and more literal meaning. Now it is used to describe how many drops of ink are placed on the paper per inch. It is one of the prime, but not only parameter that is used to describe how well the printer can reproduce the image. And, this number has nothing to do with the resolution of the image file (in pixels per inch) that was sent to the printer.

This tutorial is an exercise that will not only give you a better understanding of rescaling an image versus re-sampling it, but will also demonstrate the loss of quality that is a bi-product of up-sampling an image, or adding to the number of pixels that were not in the image when it was scanned.

To view or download the tutorial, click on the image below. I suggest you actually follow along with the tutorial using one of your own images.

Resampling Comparison

In this post and tutorial I have focused on resolution as it impacts the printing of your digital photographs. In a future post, I will cover the topic of how to properly size your photos for sharing them online.

If you found this tutorial to be helpful and would like to see other tutorials in the future, please give it a suitable star-rating and  share it with your friends.

Until next time..

 

Adjust Tone and Color Using Levels in Photoshop Elements 15


The Levels command has been a part of Elements since day one. How it works and what it does has changed little over the years. Generally most people use it to optimize the tone of a photograph, using the RGB channel only to do so.

However, working with the red, green, and blue channels, you can correct the color of the image as well.

This tutorial covers the covers using the RGB as well as the individual color channels by adjusting the triangle sliders of the histogram. It also addresses how to use the eyedroppers, and makes use of an Adjustment Layer to maintain a non-destructive editing workflow.

Click on the link below to access the tutorial.

Using the PSE 15 Levels Command

Below is a before and after comparison demoinstrating the results when the Levels command to correct both tone and color.

before-after-levelsAfter                                                                                Before

Well, that’s it for this time. If you found this tutorial helpfull, please leave a comment, rate it accordingly, or Like it. Thank you.

Until next time…

Revisiting Processing Video using Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) in Photoshop


Just about two years ago I posted this article on processing a video file using the Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) editor in Photoshop CC and how the results compared to the same video processed in Premiere Elements.

My remarks in that post are still valid today. This post is just another example of the comparison. However the videos clips are shown back to back and in slow motion to better focus on the results.

I am not suggesting that the ACR inherently is better at editing video. But for me, it is much easier to get to the final result I am after (video with punch) than is PRE 15 in this latest example. I did not try to duplicate the two results. I was happy with the PRE 15 version until I further processed it in the ACR.

I am sure that not everyone will like the ACR result, but I do. And, since I am far more familiar working with the ACR than PRE 15 in this regards, I find I can get to what I am after much quicker.

Here is the link comparing the two video clips.

pre-15-vs-acr

If you have a video and use Photoshop, try it out. My previous article outlines the steps. It is extremely easy to do if you work already with the ACR.

Let me know what you think. If you liked this post, please Like it, rate it accordingly, and share with your friends. Thanks for dropping by.

Until next time, Happy Holidays!

Using Photoshop Elements 15 Albums


As you know, there are only a limited number of sort orders that you can view your images in the Grid view, Newest, Oldest, Import Batch, and Name. What if you want to view your images by some custom order to for a slide show you are preparing? Or, maybe you want to load the media into another program, such as Premiere Elements 15 in a certain order? That is where using Albums comes in.

In this tutorial, we introduce using Albums to do the above, and other uses as well, such as making a smart search. Albums can be used for organizing your entire photo collection if you want. However, I prefer to use them for managing specific photo projects.

Click on the link below to view the PDF tutorial.

albums-tut-title

If you found the tutorial helpful, please Like and rate it accordingly – Thanks

Until next time…

 

Using the View Workspace in Photoshop Elements 15


In this installment of the ongoing series of using Photoshop Elements 15, we are going to cover the basics of using the View workspace. I primarily start a photo project using this view. For example, if I go on a trip, one of the first things I do to organize my photos and videos is to create a new Event containing them.

To view the PDF file for the tutorial, click on the image below.

pse-15-events-view

If you find this tutorial helpful, please rate it accordingly at the top of this page, and also share it with your friends who may find it helpful as well. Thank you.

Until next time…

Photoshop Elements 15 Organizer: Uploading photos from your Camera


This exercise covers uploading images from your digital camera or card reader to your computer using the Organizer of Photoshop Elements. Click here to see how to import pictures already on your computer.

What follows assumes that you have previously set the desired PSE preferences. To download a PDF file of this tutorial, please click here.

1.     Open the Organizer of Photoshop Elements.

2.     Connect your camera or a card reader to one of your computer’s USB connectors before turning on your camera or inserting your card into the reader.

3.     For a camera, put it in the normal Playback mode and turn it on if required. If you are using a card reader, insert the memory card into the appropriate slot.

4.     The Windows Auto Play dialog box similar to the one below may appear. If/when it does, click on the red X in the upper right hand corner to close it.

 

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Auto Play Dialog With Camera/Card Reader Connected

 

5.     On the Menu bar, click on Import > From Camera or Card Reader as shown below.

 

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6.     The simplified Photo Downloader dialog may open as shown in the figure below. If it does, click on the Advanced Dialog button as shown in the figure.

 

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The Advanced Dialog is shown in the next figure.

 

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7.     You should then see a bright blue bar at the top of the dialog that says Select Your Device. Click on the down arrow and select your camera/card reader in the drop down list. PSE 15 immediately reads your card reader/camera and displays thumbnails of each of the images it finds as shown in the figure below. Note, in the figure below, I have connected my iPhone to the computer. PSE 15 treats it as a camera. Also note that for an iPhone/iPad, it displays all of the photos and videos in your Camera Roll.

 

Also, since you will probably have far more photos on your iPhone than you want to upload, you will probably want to click on Uncheck All in the lower left of the dialog, and then click on the small square by each photo you want to upload.

 

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Note, no images have been copied to the computer yet.

 

8.     Each of the thumbnails has a small white box just outside of its lower right corner which has a green check indicating that image will be copied to the computer. To skip any images, click on its white box to remove the green check.

9.     On the right side of the dialog are the options (storage location, red eye removal etc.) that will be used during the upload process. For our purposes, we will assume that you have already set these using the desired Edit > Preferences and are satisfied with the choices shown. See the figure below.

 

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10.   Click on the Get Media button in the lower right corner of the dialog to begin copying the photos to your computer.

 

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11.   After a short time, a small brief message appears for a second or so indicating how many images were imported. The imported images are then displayed in the grid and are ready for tagging etc.

12.   You can now disconnect the camera or card reader in the appropriate manner. For an iPhone/iPad, out can simply remove the device.

If you found this tutorial helpful, please rate it accordingly, and share it with others.

Until next time.