Tweak Your Colors With Photoshop’s Selective Color Command


In this post, I want to highlight a technique to selectively adjust color in your images. There are many ways to do this. This technique does require using Photoshop CC or an earlier version of the program. Photoshop Elements does not have the command, Selective Color, that this technique uses.

I learned about this technique from a video tutorial by Blake Rudis of F.64 Academy. The link to the video is shown below. He also provides free Actions that automate using the technique on three different style of photos.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rzdEfrmdMwc

In Photoshop Elements, the closest you can come to the Selective Color command, is using the Hue/Saturation command, and selecting individual color channels, rather than just using the Master Channel. But as Rudis points out in the video, this is not the same as the Selective Color approach.

Additionally, the technique can be used to provide subtle changes, as well as more pronounced changes to a photo, as is illustrated in the comparison below. It is normally applied after the primary adjustments to brightness, contrast, and color have been applied to the image.

Sel Color Before After

So, if you have Photoshop, give this technique a try, let me know what you think, and post a link to your image here.

Until next time…

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Real Easy Technique for Better Sunsets


On a recent cruise, I took dozens of sunsets. Most of them were not what I was looking for. I either ended up with a blown out sun, or the picture was too dark for my liking.

Today, I received an email from Steve Arnold of Post Processing Mastery that should a very easy technique to tone down an over exposed sun. Although he explains how to do it using Photoshop, it is well in the capabilities of Photoshop Elements.

Below shows the results I obtained on one of my sunset images.

Brush Sunset Tech

The Before is on the right, and the After is on the left. Some sunset images will respond better than others to this technique. And remember, you can tweak the result by adjusting the brush layer’s Opacity.

Here is the link to the video that explains the technique.

http://dons.creativetips.ppmastery.com/sunblur

Until next time.

 

Using Multiple Layers to Fix the Sky in PSE 15


There is an abundance of methods to fix a sky in a photograph. They range from entirely replacing the sky from another image to enhancing the existing sky in some way.

In this PSE 15 tutorial, I will cover a simple way to darken an existing sky that is a good exercise in using multiple Adjustment Layers, which are a key component to non-destructive editing. Within the tutorial, I cover inverting the created mask, so that additional and different corrections can be applied to the foreground in the image.

Click on the figure below to read the tutorial.

layers-pallet

If  you found this tutorial to be helpful, and would like to see more in the future, please click on the Like button, or better yet leave a comment.

Until next time…

Yet Another Way to Improve a Sky


There are a many ways to darken a sky to make it more dramatic. That’s good, because they often show up in your photos as something less than hoped we for or remembered, being too bright and lacking color.

This technique is somewhat different and does require Photoshop. It is not possible to use it with Photoshop Elements. Fortunately, there are many other techniques that work well with Elements. Here are the steps.

  1. Open the image in Photoshop.
  2. Duplicate the background layer – always a good idea.
  3. Make a black and white adjustment layer.
  4. Adjust the color sliders as desired to darken the sky. Usually, the blue and the cyan sliders have the biggest effect.
  5. Change the Blending Mode of the B&W Adjustment Layer to Darken. You will probably see some color coming back in the non-blue areas.
  6. Reduce the layer’s Opacity to 40-50%. If you go too far, the sky quickly returns to its original brightness.
  7. At this point I may often add a Vibrance or Saturation Adjustment Layer to further enhance the sky. Also, in some photos, adjusting the other sliders in the Black and White Adjustment Layer will add additional impact to the photo.

Dark Blend mode Ex

As you can see from the comparison here, the change is subtle, but effective. In this photo the water was also affected.

I learned about this technique from www.postprocessingmastery.com. It is worth checking out this site to learn more about this techniques as well as others.

Try it out on some of your photos and share them in the comments below.