Using Actions in Photoshop Elements 2018


One of the capabilities the Photo Editor has had for a long time is the ability to play Photoshop Actions.

An Action is similar to a macro in Excel or Word that will complete a series of steps or commands automatically, once started from a single click of the mouse. Using Actions can greatly increase the speed of performing tasks that take multiple steps and are something  you do repeatedly while editing a photo.

However, Elements cannot write Actions. The Action must be created using Photoshop CC, and then saved. Additionally, the Action cannot contain any commands that are not in PSE, or used by it internally.

Actions Dialog

The link below is to an AppTip Sheet that provides an introduction to using Actions in PSE 2018. The process is similar to earlier versions. It used to be a Guided Edit in an earlier version of PSE.

Action Eg

In my next post I will cover how to download, install, and run an Action written by a third party, of which there are hundreds of free ones online.

Until next time…

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Create Unique Tiny Planet Image Using Photoshop Elements


Tiny Planet images have become quite popular on phot sharing sites and in social media sites, such as Facebook. To create a Tiny Planet image, you generally must start with a spherical or 360-degree panorama. Using drone or special 360-degree cameras make it easy to take and stitch the individual photos together.

Tiny Planet eg

This AppTip Sheet describes how to create a Tiny Planet image using Photoshop Elements. It begins with a 360-degree panorama shot with a Mavic Pro or similar drone and previously projected with a program such as okolo.com. There are many programs and websites that can produce Tiny Planets. However, using PSE to create it allows you to produce a high resolution image, and also allows you to the image.

Stitched+projected 360 Pan

Click on the figure above to display or print the PDF of the AppTip Sheet.

If you found it helpful and interesting don’t hesitate to Like or Share it below.

Until next time…

 

AppTip Sheet – Using Exfi Patcher


On February 17, 2018, I posted an AppTip Sheet. The AppTip Sheet that I described there is no longer accurate. It refers to the website, http://360Facebook.com. This website has been replaced by, http://nadirpatcher.com. This new site performs a similar function as before, but also includes additional capabilities. Click on the figure below to link to the AppTip Sheet that describes how to use this website to post 360-degree panorama photos on Facebook.

FB 360 Image

Until next time…

AppTip Sheet – Sharing 360 Panoramas Using Okolo.com


In my last post, I described how to take and share 360 panoramas taken with my Mavic Pro drone on Facebook using http://www.360facebook.com. Using that approach is fine and pretty simple, but resulting photo resolution is limited by the resolution of the Mavic’s camera. This means as you pan on the shared 360 panorama, the amount you can zoom in is limited.

In this post, I include my AppTip Sheet for using http://www.okolo.com to produce the 360-degree panorama. Using the automated spherical panorama mode on my Mavic Pro, it takes 34 full resolution images, that are then stitched together and projected by Okolo to form the 360-degree panorama. The result is a much better rendition.

Click on the figure below to view/print the AppTip Sheet that shows the steps.

Using Okolo

The link below is the result as viewed on Okolo.com. Make sure you view it in full screen  and notice how much detail is visible when you zoom to the maximum. One thing to note, Okolo only accepts JPEG images, and states the maximum size of each image is 5 Mb. However, mine are often a tad larger, and they have been accepted.

https://okolo.com/o/264e8898-1382-11e8-b3ab-001e67995544#y0p10z85

Keep in mind a couple of points. The images that are uploaded to Okolo do not have to come from a drone, or if they do, the shots can be manually taken. Also, I believe there is a minimum of 10 individual shots to project a 360-degree panorama by Okolo.

Until next time…

 

 

 

My AppTip Sheets and Why I Bring Them Up


March 27, 2018: This post was originally published on February 17, 2018. The AppTip Sheet that I described here is no longer accurate. It refers to the website, http://360Facebook.com. It has been replaced by a new website, http://nadirpatcher.com. This new site performs a similar function as before, but also includes additional capabilities.  I refer the readers to my later post.

I have a new format that I use to help me do certain tasks on my computer or other devices. I named this format AppTip Sheet. For example, these AppTip Sheets may be the steps involved to accomplish a particular Photoshop editing technique, or how to use a particular Photoshop tool. Or, they may deal with various steps I need to perform in flying my DJI Mavic Pro drone, or how to perform a particular calibration on it.

In general, I write these AppTip Sheets to document any thing that I do not do routinely enough to remember each and every step, but yet do them often enough that a quick cheat sheet helps me avoid pulling out the manual or other document to complete the task. The key is that I try to keep these AppTip Sheets as short as possible.

Occasionally, I may decide that a particular AppTip Sheet may be useful to others, and so I will post it here.

Right now, I am experimenting with using my Mavic Pro flight modes to take 360-degree Spherical panoramas for posting on social media. Once posted, you can use your mouse to zoom in on the subject and pan around throughout the entire scene. That is the subject of this post.

This particular AppTip Sheet deals with posting a spherical panorama on Facebook using 360Facebook.com from the browser on your PC. This is only one of the several ways to accomplish this, and I will explore others in the future. So click on the figure below to get a better idea of what these AppTip Sheets are like.

360 Pano posted

Until next time.

Novell Way to Remove Color Cast Using PSE 2018 AppTip Sheet


I use Photoshop and Photoshop Elements pretty much daily. But I often can’t remember the exact steps to complete a certain edit or effect that I want to create. I don’t do it enough. I either have to go to my notes, a magazine article, or perhaps a previous blog post to fill in the blanks to fill in the blanks of my memory.

What I have been doing for awhile now is to prepare a cheat sheet that lays out the basic steps concisely. I think that these cheat sheets may come in handy for others as well.

That is where the AppTip Sheets come in. They are kept as short as possible, and assume the reader knows how to use the subject program. They just need a little help in putting steps together. Another possible scenario is to provide a top level view of the various screens for a new app on a smartphone or tablet. These cheat sheets help me a lot. Maybe they will you, as well.

So, in this post, I have included an AppTip Sheet for removing a colorcast in a photo. The screens are for Photoshop Elements 2018, but older versions of Elements work equally as well.

Remove Color Cast

Let me know what you think of this type of format. I plan to post others shortly. If you have an idea for a certain topic or program, let me know that as well.

Until next time…