What is Lightroom CC Classic Anyway?


In my initial post, I stated that I was switching my image/video media management from Photoshop Elements, specifically its Organizer to Lightroom CC Classic. In the attached AppTip Sheet, I explained how I prepared for migrating my PSE 2019 Catalog to Lightroom CC Classic, going on to describe the actual importing of the Catalog.

Before going any further in this series, I will very briefly describe what Lightroom CC Classic is all about. Please click on the link below.

LR Logo

Next time, we will get started in actually working with Lightroom CC Classic. In this series, we will first go over what we need to know about working with the Library module, Lightroom’s equivalent and superior sister to PSE 2019’s Organizer. Then we will move on to the Develop and other modules making up the program.

Until then…

 

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I am Changing My Photo Manage From Photoshop Elments to Lightroom CC Classic


I have been using the Organizer in Photoshop Elements to manage my photos and videos since Adobe first combined it with Photoshop Elements 2 to create Photoshop Elements 3 (PSE 3). It has served me well.

Adobe has routinely updated the program annually to incrementally add new capabilities and features. I have installed each new version. Over the years I have created and maintained multiple Catalogs for a variety of reasons. All my photos and more recent videos are contained in two main Catalogs, that together have over 60,000 items. I have other special Catalogs primarily for videos. I even have a Catalog devoted to managing my large collection of MP3 audio recordings.

However, I have decided to move on to a workflow that uses Lightroom CC Classic for media management and basic editing, and Photoshop CC for more involved editing. I have used both programs for several years as well, but not as my primary software. It is not that PSE no longer works for me. It is just that I want to expand my horizons a bit.

As I transition from Elements to Lightroom, I will add a series of demos and tutorials that will hopefully help others make the transition and learn the basics of Lightroom CC Classic. I will continue to post new Photoshop Elements tutorials from time to time, as topics come up that interest me and might help others.

In this first AppTip Sheet, I will describe the steps I have taken to convert my PSE Catalogs to Lightroom CC Classic. It begins with preparing your Photoshop Elements 2019 Organizer for migration. The steps are also comatible with early versions of Elements.

In the tutorial that is linked below, I will be using my PSE 2019 Catalog that essentially contains all the photos/videos shot before 2015 as the example.  The name of the Catalog is “PSE 2019 Fixed Prime Photos 7-3-14”. This Catalog has 46932 total items.

  • 45,522 Photos
  • 1,137 Videos
  • 98 Audio Files
  • 175 PSE Projects

The vast majority of the media are on a Drobo, Drive O. But as shown in the left column in the figure below, they are scattered all over my PC on various internal and external drives. 

Click Here to view or download the tutorial PDF.

Until next time…

Maintaining and Protecting Your PSE 2019 Catalog


In this post I will highlight some tips for maintaining and protecting your PSE 2019 Catalog. They are contained in the AppTip Sheet that is linked below. Over the years I have presented tutorials on how to use the Backup/Restore commands that our built into PSE. Even though these tutorials were written for previous versions, the steps and screens are virtually the same in PSE 2019.  

Click on the link below to open the PDF file that describes how to protect and maintain your PSE 2019 Catalog.

Using the tips described in the AppTip Sheet will ensure that you spend your time doing the fun things that PSE 2019 allows, rather than troubleshooting problems with your Catalog.

Until next time…

Using Photoshop CC to Prepare a Panosphere for Display on Okolo.com


Back in February, I posted an article how I use Okolo.com to display a panosphere. Okolo stitches the uploaded images into a 360-degree panorama or panosphere. In this post, I expand a bit on the earlier one. Okolo does not accept RAW images, which I prefer to take when using its panorama shooting modes. It only accepts JPEG images, and they can only be 5 Mb in size. So other software must be used to edit the RAW images, and then convert and resize them.

This post illustrates my workflow for preparing the 34 RAW images my DJI Mavic Pro takes using Photoshop CC. It goes no to outline the steps to upload them to Okolo.com to create and display the panosphere. I have detailed the steps in the PDF file that is linked below.

2018-12-13_19-34-22

Using PS CC and Okolo to Display 360 Panosphere

The workflow I describe here uses PS CC Action that does the necessary steps to convert and resize each image automatically. It is a simple action, and for the purposes of this post, I have not covered how to write it.

Finally, this can also be done in Photoshop Elements. I will probably write another post soon to better illustrate how to do it with the capabilities that are in Elements. Stay tuned.

If you found this tutorial to be helpful, please star-rate and Like it. And of course, any and all comments are welcome.

New Webpage With Links to my Photoshop Elements Tutorials


Over the past couple of years I have been blogging tutorials on Photoshop Elements. When I started the latest version was PSE 15. When it was replaced with PSE 2018, I used screen shots from it for subsequent tutorials. I did the same when PSE 2019 was introduced.

Almost all of the tutorials are based on updated versions of my class handouts I used when I was teaching Photoshop Elements. The links are to PDF files for the most part which can be downloaded and printed if desired. There are also a few videos included. The tutorials cover both the Organizer and Photo Editing using Elements.

Click on the image below to go to the webpage that has the complete list.

Tiny Planet eg

Loading and Using Luminosity Masks in PSE 2019


A couple of months ago, I posted a tutorial on how to play back the sample Actions that have been a part of PSE for some time. A few years ago, Adobe made playing Actions easier, but they still can only be run. The Actions must be written by Photoshop in such a way as to use only those commands available internally in PSE or ones that are accessible by the user.

There are scores of Actions available online that can be loaded and played within PSE. In this tutorial, I demonstrate how to load and install a very creative set of actions by Tony Kuiper that make it very easy to apply Luminosity Masks in PSE for advanced photo editing. If you have been following photo editing topics, currently one of the most popular is using Luminosity Masks Now you can use this advanced technique from within PSE.

TK Luminosity Mask

Below is the link to my PDF file of the tutorial that you can easily download or print. By the way, there is a lot of additional tutorials and other information available on Tony Kuiper’s website.

Loading and Using Luminosity Masks Actions

I hope you enjoyed the tutorial and found it helpful. If so, please Like  it, give it a Star Rating and Share with others who may also find it helpful.

Until next time.

Applying Photoshop CC Watercolor Painting Technique Using Elements


One of the advantages of using the Photo Editor expert mode in Photoshop Elements is that Elements is based on th same engine as used in Photoshop CC. This is quite evident once you get into the dialogs for specific commands and tools.

This post links to an AppTip Sheet that clearly illustrates this by applying a watercolor effect to a photo. This effect starts with applying the Watercolor filter, but goes well beyond this simple effect,

I learned the technique from an article by Colin Smith of Photoshop Cafe. He explains his technique using Photoshop CC. However, it uses the commands and tools that have long been a part of Photoshop.

I was able to apply the same technique in PSE 2018 with only a couple of modifications. My AppTip Sheet breaks with my usual practice and topics for these tip sheets. The technique involves many steps, and this the TipSheet is much longer than normal.

This technique allows for wide range of customization in the settings as you apply the steps. Below shows the before and after for the photo and settings I chose.

Paige + Scot PS Watercolor

Here is the link to the AppTip Sheet.

Try this out and let me know what you think in the comments below.

Until next time…