Removing Unwanted Objects in Your Photos Using Photoshop Elements 15


It has been far too long since I posted my last Photoshop Elements 15 tutorial. During the past month I have spent a lot of time traveling to softball diamonds and soccer fields to watch my two granddaughters compete in their respective sports. So before the next tournament comes up, I want to post at least one.

In this tutorial, I cover the Clone Stamp tool, the Healing Brush, and the Spot Healing Brush. The Clone Stamp has been around forever, and the healing brushes were added some time after that. More recent versions of Elements added Content Aware technology to the healing brushes. In many cases this technology can significantly improve the results. However, I have to admit there are times when I revert back to the traditional Clone Stamp Tool to complete the task.

As usual the written tutorial is provided in PDF format that is easy to download and print. The figure below shows the before image and the initial application of the Clone Stamp for the example used in the tutorial. Click on it to read or download the tutorial.

Before After Cloning

If you found this tutorial helpful, please star-rate it and share it on social media. Thanks for stopping by, and I’ll be back soon with another post.

Until next time…

Rescaling vs. Re-Sampling Photos and Why it Matters


The subject of resizing your photographs to make a high quality print or to share it online continues to be question that comes up in forums. Part of the confusion stems from the terminology itself. In this post/post, I will discuss the subject from the standpoint of scanning a negative or slide. First, Are a couple of comments about the terminology.

Resolution – Dots Per Inch

Resolution is generally referred to as either dots per inch (dpi) or pixels per inch (ppi). What can lead to confusion is that dpi is used to describe the resolution of a scanner. For example, a scanner that is capable of scanning 35 mm negatives may have a optical resolution of 3200 dpi or greater. The word optical here means there are no mathematics being used to artificially increase the resolution. For the best quality, you should scan at or below the optical resolution of the scanner.

Resolution – Pixels Per Inch

Referring to a scanned image, once you open the image in say, Photoshop Elements or Photoshop, the terminology changes. Now the same resolution is measured in and referred to pixels per inch (ppi). The resolution is the same as you scanned, the term just changes. For example, if a negative is scanned at 3200 dpi and then opened in PSE 15 using the Image > Resize > Image Size command, the dialog below is opened. The resolution of 3200 ppi is shown.

3200 ppi ex

Print Resolution – Dots per Inch

When describing the resolution of an inkjet printer, dots per inch or dpi is again used. However, at this point in the process, the term takes on a whole new and more literal meaning. Now it is used to describe how many drops of ink are placed on the paper per inch. It is one of the prime, but not only parameter that is used to describe how well the printer can reproduce the image. And, this number has nothing to do with the resolution of the image file (in pixels per inch) that was sent to the printer.

This tutorial is an exercise that will not only give you a better understanding of rescaling an image versus re-sampling it, but will also demonstrate the loss of quality that is a bi-product of up-sampling an image, or adding to the number of pixels that were not in the image when it was scanned.

To view or download the tutorial, click on the image below. I suggest you actually follow along with the tutorial using one of your own images.

Resampling Comparison

In this post and tutorial I have focused on resolution as it impacts the printing of your digital photographs. In a future post, I will cover the topic of how to properly size your photos for sharing them online.

If you found this tutorial to be helpful and would like to see other tutorials in the future, please give it a suitable star-rating and  share it with your friends.

Until next time..

 

Selectively Changing the Color in Photoshop Elements 15


There are many ways to change the color of a specific object in a photo in Photoshop Elements 15 and earlier versions. In this quick tutorial, I’ll use the Hue/Saturation command on an Adjustment Layer, and then its Layer Mask to apply the color to only the desired area. Even if you are not interested in changing the color of something in your image, going through the exercise is a good review of using an Adjustment Layer’s mask. And besides, since the steps are non-destructive, you do not change the image itself.

Here is what we started with.

After we changed the color of Lucy’s jersey.

Click on the link below to view and download the tutorial.

How to Change Color Selectively in Photoshop Elements 15

If you found this tutorial helpful and would like to see more, please click on the Like button and share it with friends.

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Saving an Edited Image in Photoshop Elements 15


This is a short tutorial on saving an image you edited in Photoshop Elements 15. It covers how to save it as a Version Set, so that the original is not altered. When you view it in PSE 15’s Organizer, the edited version is stacked with the original. By expanding the stack, you can see both images, and open either one once again in the Photo Editor to do additional editing.

Click on the figure below to view or download the tutorial.

If you found this quick review of saving edited in Photoshop Elements 15 helpful, please click on the Like button, or Share it on Facebook. Better yet, leave a comment. If thee is a particular PSE 15 tutorial you would like to see, let me know by leaving a comment.

Until next time…

Using Multiple Layers to Fix the Sky in PSE 15


There is an abundance of methods to fix a sky in a photograph. They range from entirely replacing the sky from another image to enhancing the existing sky in some way.

In this PSE 15 tutorial, I will cover a simple way to darken an existing sky that is a good exercise in using multiple Adjustment Layers, which are a key component to non-destructive editing. Within the tutorial, I cover inverting the created mask, so that additional and different corrections can be applied to the foreground in the image.

Click on the figure below to read the tutorial.

layers-pallet

If  you found this tutorial to be helpful, and would like to see more in the future, please click on the Like button, or better yet leave a comment.

Until next time…

Adjust Tone and Color Using Levels in Photoshop Elements 15


The Levels command has been a part of Elements since day one. How it works and what it does has changed little over the years. Generally most people use it to optimize the tone of a photograph, using the RGB channel only to do so.

However, working with the red, green, and blue channels, you can correct the color of the image as well.

This tutorial covers the covers using the RGB as well as the individual color channels by adjusting the triangle sliders of the histogram. It also addresses how to use the eyedroppers, and makes use of an Adjustment Layer to maintain a non-destructive editing workflow.

Click on the link below to access the tutorial.

Using the PSE 15 Levels Command

Below is a before and after comparison demoinstrating the results when the Levels command to correct both tone and color.

before-after-levelsAfter                                                                                Before

Well, that’s it for this time. If you found this tutorial helpfull, please leave a comment, rate it accordingly, or Like it. Thank you.

Until next time…

Stitching a Panorama in Photoshop Elements 15


Photoshop Elements has had the ability to stitch a series of images together to form a panorama for a long time now. However over the years, the Photomerge technology to do this has improved significantly.

More recent versions Elements can automatically fill in the gaps around the edges using Content Aware Fill to make the finished image rectangle. After doing this, little or no further editing is required.

You can begin the panorama either by selecting the photos in the Organizer, or directly from the Photo Editor. In older versions, the Photomerge Panorama was found under the Enhance menu in the Editor. However, beginning with PSE 14, it is found in the Guided Edit View under Photomerge. In fact, all of PSE 15’s Photomerge Edits are in the Guided Edit View. We show how to initiate the Photomerge Panorama process using both approaches in this tutorial.

Click on the figure below to view the tutorial.

photomerge-pano

If you found this tutorial helpful, please take a moment to rate it accordingly and share it  with others. Thank you!

Until next time…