Dipping My Feet into Adobe Portfolio


For some time now Adobe as offered a free website building tool to help you build your own online photo gallery. It is called Adobe Portfolio, and it is free with any subscription to the Creative Cloud. In my case I subscribe to the option that gives me Lightroom Classic, Lightroom, and Photoshop CC for ten dollars a month.

Adobe has added new features since they first introduced it. I played with it a couple of years ago, but never really got into it. So today I began my second venture. I have put up a very basic gallery so far. There are plenty of additional elements I can and will in time.

But my first attempt at least allows the viewer an easy way to view the few pictures I have uploaded so far. It is easy to upload your photos from Lightroom. You just put your photos in a Lightroom Album and upload the pictures from there. If you are a Lightroom Classic user, you must sync the desired Collection with Lightroom where that Collection becomes an Album. You can also just upload pictures directly from your computer.

Here is the URL for Adobe Portfolio https://portfolio.adobe.com/

adobe portfolio

Here is the link to my first simple gallery.  https://donstouder.myportfolio.com/

2019-09-18_19-54-16 My Portfolio page

There is a lot more customizing that I will be doing as time goes on. As with most everything, there is a bunch of YouTube tutorials that should bring me up to speed pretty quickly.

Until next time…

Lightroom Classic Library Module Workspace Overview – Part 1


As I have described in previous posts, I am transitioning from using the Photoshop Elements Organizer to Lightroom to manage my photos and videos. In this video, I review the general workspace of Lightroom Classic’s Library module. To be clear, this video is intended for new users of Lightroom who may have little or no experience using the program. As I increasingly use Lightroom CC as the hub of my workflow, I will add additional tutorials and videos.

To keep the length of the video down, I have basically covered only the left panel of the workspace. In a subsequent video, I will cover the other parts of this module’s workspace.

If you found this video helpful, and would like to see more, please leave a comment, share it on social media, and give it a Like.

Thanks for watching, and I’ll see you next time.

 

 

Creating a New Catalog in Lightroom Classic CC


I basically started off this recent series of posts dealing with Lightroom Classic CC describing how I prepared for and then imported my Catalog from Photoshop Elements 2019. In this post, I cover how to make a Lightroom Catalog from scratch. Even if you have a Lightroom Catalog already, you may want to create a small one that you can use to test new features as they are introduced into Lightroom without running the risk of damaging your primary Catalog.

File New Catalog

As you will see, there are two main ways to create a new Catalog. Click on the link below to view or print the tutorial itself.

HOW TO CREATE A NEW CATALOG IN LIGHTROOM CLASSIC CC

If you found this post to be helpful and would like to see more like it, please Star-Rate the post at the top and share it on social media. Thank you.

Until next time…

 

 

Brief Overview of Lightroom Classic’s Workspace


In the previous posts, I have introduced the general aspects of Lightroom Classic CC. The attached tutorial to this post, continues and essential completes the macro view of the program. It addresses the various workspaces or modules of the program, concentrating on the Library module, which is where most users begin their work. Once this is done, I will begin with tips on actually doing work in Lightroom.

Remember, I started this series of tutorials and demonstrations as a window into my efforts in converting my Photoshop Elements 2019 Catalog to Lightroom to manage my photo collection.  Below is the link to the PDF file that describes the workspaces and their layout.

Lightroom Classic CC Workspaces

If you found this tutorial to be helpful, please give it a Like and Share it using the buttons at the bottom. Also, I welcome any comments and suggestions you have.

Until next time…

Setting Lightroom Classic CC Preferences


Soon after you create a new Catalog in Lightroom CC Classic, you need to address how you want to work. To do this you need to take a look at the preferences that are available. The problem is you may not know enough about Lightroom at this point to feel comfortable about setting its preferences. Don’t worry. Sticking with the defaults will not get you into trouble, and they can easily be changed at any time. In the AppTip Sheets of this post, I will address the most important settings.

There two main preferences commands, Catalog Settings, and Preferences. In this post, I will address both of these. Both are accessed from Edit on the Menu Bar.

The AppTip Sheet linked below deals with the Catalog Settings.

Catalog Settings

The other AppTip Sheet covers the Preferences options.

Preferences

I hope you found these tutorials helpful. If you did please click on the Like button, and Share buttons. Thanks for dropping by.

Until next time…

Postscript to PSE 2019 Auto Creations Video


A couple of weeks ago, I posted a video on the new hub and Auto Creations feature. You can review that post here.

Here are a couple of things I did not emphasize, but should have. To begin with, Auto Creations uses AI to analyze your photos and videos to automatically identify and create slideshows, video & photo collages, or even just selecting/extracting some interesting images from your videos.

When it is activated, as described in the video, it works in the background to produce these creations, even if PSE 2019 is not running. It can create a maximum of 40 of these editable creations, and then stops. You can delete any or all of these creations or incorporate them into the Organizer. Once the number gets below forty, new Auto Creations are produced. If the Catalog has not changed with new imports, they may be repeats or similar creations previously generated.

Here is how I use this in my workflow. I generally turn off Auto Creations, since it appears to impact the performance of my PC. It may not have any impact  on yours. I review and either incorporate/edit the Auto Creations generated, or delete them. I can do this either with the Auto Creations on or off.

Now when I take a new set of photos perhaps from an event or just a photo shot, I import them into the Catalog, and then I turn Auto Creations on again. After a time, PSE 2019 has produced new creations from my recent imports. I even get a Notification on my desktop in Windows 10 telling me that new creations have been produced. I review the new creations and then turn Auto Creations off again. This process works well for me.

New ACs 12-21-18

I suspect that Adobe will enhance the Auto Creations feature in future versions of the program. I suspect one of those improvements will be to better identify the events and other information about the photos and videos selected for the creation.

If you found this and the original post helpful, please star-rate it and or share it with others. Thank you.

Until next time…

Using Photoshop CC to Prepare a Panosphere for Display on Okolo.com


Back in February, I posted an article how I use Okolo.com to display a panosphere. Okolo stitches the uploaded images into a 360-degree panorama or panosphere. In this post, I expand a bit on the earlier one. Okolo does not accept RAW images, which I prefer to take when using its panorama shooting modes. It only accepts JPEG images, and they can only be 5 Mb in size. So other software must be used to edit the RAW images, and then convert and resize them.

This post illustrates my workflow for preparing the 34 RAW images my DJI Mavic Pro takes using Photoshop CC. It goes no to outline the steps to upload them to Okolo.com to create and display the panosphere. I have detailed the steps in the PDF file that is linked below.

2018-12-13_19-34-22

Using PS CC and Okolo to Display 360 Panosphere

The workflow I describe here uses PS CC Action that does the necessary steps to convert and resize each image automatically. It is a simple action, and for the purposes of this post, I have not covered how to write it.

Finally, this can also be done in Photoshop Elements. I will probably write another post soon to better illustrate how to do it with the capabilities that are in Elements. Stay tuned.

If you found this tutorial to be helpful, please star-rate and Like it. And of course, any and all comments are welcome.