Scott Kelby’s Latest Webinar


This morning Scott Kelby presented his latest free webinar on backing up your photos. I tuned in a bit late, but the webinar is still available at the following link.

Scott Kelby Webinar – Backing Up Your Photos

In fact, you can also view previous webinars here as well.

The webinar is focused on those who use Adobe’s Lightroom Classic. For those of you are are Lightroom users, who are familar with Scott Kelby, you may already be familar with his SLIM – Simplified Lightroom Image Management system.

There is a complete updated course on Slim on KelbyOne.com

But even if you do not you will probably get multiple tips by watching the webinar.

Some of the key points discussed in the webinar include:

  • Put all of your photos on one external hard drive.

  • Backup up your photos to a second external hard drive.

  • Also, back up your photos to cloud Storage.

  • Put all of your photos on your external drive into a single super folder. Your existing folders are then sub-folders of this super folder.

  • In Lightroom Classic, use only one Catalog.

The webinar goes on to discuss additional Lightroom topics. Even if you do not use Lightroom, the above practices are worth doing.

Until next time…

 

How Photoshop Elements has Changed Throughout the Years


As I read the discussions in various forums and Facebook groups, it is apparent that many users continue to use older versions of Photoshop Elements. Many users are even using older versions than PSE 11, released in the Fall of 2012. This version is significant, because Adobe changed the complete look and feel of the program in that version.

One of the most commonly asked questions from users of older versions is whether or not it is worthwhile to upgrade to the then current version. The answer for a given user depends upon their circumstances. It is often driven by changes in the computer they use, its operating system, and/or the camera they use.

Today, we are probably about half way through the product life cycle of PSE 2020. If history repeats itself, PSE 2021 will be released sometime this Fall. So the question many users ask is should I upgrade to the latest version. Adobe has a excellent table that compares PSE 2020 features with previous ones going back to PSE 15. You can access it at the link below:

PSE 2020 Logo

For several years now I have maintained my own table. It is more detailed than the one in the above link and goes back to PSE 11. The link below is to my current version. It is an Excel spreadsheet. 

Feature Comparison PSE 11 Through PSE 2020

If you have been struggling to decide whether to upgrade or not, I hope you found this information helpful. If so please star-rate it or Like/Share the post. Also, I am always open to comments.

Until next time…

Addendum: Some were not able to open my spreadsheet. I have converted it to a PDF file. The link to it is below.

Photoshop Elements Feature Comparison PSE 11 through PSE 2020 PDF File.

 

Dipping My Feet into Adobe Portfolio


For some time now Adobe as offered a free website building tool to help you build your own online photo gallery. It is called Adobe Portfolio, and it is free with any subscription to the Creative Cloud. In my case I subscribe to the option that gives me Lightroom Classic, Lightroom, and Photoshop CC for ten dollars a month.

Adobe has added new features since they first introduced it. I played with it a couple of years ago, but never really got into it. So today I began my second venture. I have put up a very basic gallery so far. There are plenty of additional elements I can and will in time.

But my first attempt at least allows the viewer an easy way to view the few pictures I have uploaded so far. It is easy to upload your photos from Lightroom. You just put your photos in a Lightroom Album and upload the pictures from there. If you are a Lightroom Classic user, you must sync the desired Collection with Lightroom where that Collection becomes an Album. You can also just upload pictures directly from your computer.

Here is the URL for Adobe Portfolio https://portfolio.adobe.com/

adobe portfolio

Here is the link to my first simple gallery.  https://donstouder.myportfolio.com/

2019-09-18_19-54-16 My Portfolio page

There is a lot more customizing that I will be doing as time goes on. As with most everything, there is a bunch of YouTube tutorials that should bring me up to speed pretty quickly.

Until next time…

Lightroom Classic Library Module Workspace Overview – Part 1


As I have described in previous posts, I am transitioning from using the Photoshop Elements Organizer to Lightroom to manage my photos and videos. In this video, I review the general workspace of Lightroom Classic’s Library module. To be clear, this video is intended for new users of Lightroom who may have little or no experience using the program. As I increasingly use Lightroom CC as the hub of my workflow, I will add additional tutorials and videos.

To keep the length of the video down, I have basically covered only the left panel of the workspace. In a subsequent video, I will cover the other parts of this module’s workspace.

If you found this video helpful, and would like to see more, please leave a comment, share it on social media, and give it a Like.

Thanks for watching, and I’ll see you next time.

 

 

Creating a New Catalog in Lightroom Classic CC


I basically started off this recent series of posts dealing with Lightroom Classic CC describing how I prepared for and then imported my Catalog from Photoshop Elements 2019. In this post, I cover how to make a Lightroom Catalog from scratch. Even if you have a Lightroom Catalog already, you may want to create a small one that you can use to test new features as they are introduced into Lightroom without running the risk of damaging your primary Catalog.

File New Catalog

As you will see, there are two main ways to create a new Catalog. Click on the link below to view or print the tutorial itself.

HOW TO CREATE A NEW CATALOG IN LIGHTROOM CLASSIC CC

If you found this post to be helpful and would like to see more like it, please Star-Rate the post at the top and share it on social media. Thank you.

Until next time…

 

 

Brief Overview of Lightroom Classic’s Workspace


In the previous posts, I have introduced the general aspects of Lightroom Classic CC. The attached tutorial to this post, continues and essential completes the macro view of the program. It addresses the various workspaces or modules of the program, concentrating on the Library module, which is where most users begin their work. Once this is done, I will begin with tips on actually doing work in Lightroom.

Remember, I started this series of tutorials and demonstrations as a window into my efforts in converting my Photoshop Elements 2019 Catalog to Lightroom to manage my photo collection.  Below is the link to the PDF file that describes the workspaces and their layout.

Lightroom Classic CC Workspaces

If you found this tutorial to be helpful, please give it a Like and Share it using the buttons at the bottom. Also, I welcome any comments and suggestions you have.

Until next time…

Setting Lightroom Classic CC Preferences


Soon after you create a new Catalog in Lightroom CC Classic, you need to address how you want to work. To do this you need to take a look at the preferences that are available. The problem is you may not know enough about Lightroom at this point to feel comfortable about setting its preferences. Don’t worry. Sticking with the defaults will not get you into trouble, and they can easily be changed at any time. In the AppTip Sheets of this post, I will address the most important settings.

There two main preferences commands, Catalog Settings, and Preferences. In this post, I will address both of these. Both are accessed from Edit on the Menu Bar.

The AppTip Sheet linked below deals with the Catalog Settings.

Catalog Settings

The other AppTip Sheet covers the Preferences options.

Preferences

I hope you found these tutorials helpful. If you did please click on the Like button, and Share buttons. Thanks for dropping by.

Until next time…