Copying a Selection From One Image to Another Using Photoshop Elements 15


This is a topic that is always one that generates a lot of discussion and in various photo editing forums and Facebook groups. It continues to be a popular topic, not only because it is something that we all want to do some time, but because recent improvements in photo editing programs and new programs are beginning to employ AI-enhanced tools to make the selection. And it is the quality of the selection that will make or break the final result.

In this tutorial I will go through the steps to select the image in the first photo and then copy it to the second photo. I start with using the Quick Selection tool of PSE 15, and then fine-tune the selection with the Selection Brush tool. I do mention the Refine Edge tool, but I have chosen to leave a more detailed discussion of it for another time and dedicated tutorial.

Below are the two initial photos. I want to copy the little girl into the picture of the sky to make it appear she is standing on clouds. True, it is not very creative, but the steps are there waiting to be used for someone with more creativity and skill than I have. This process includes several steps, so the tutorial is longer than most of mine.

Photo Examples 13-127

Photo Examples 13-197

Here is the final result.

Photo Examples 13-127_edited-1

With a little more work, I could have faded her feet out a little to add to the realism of the effect, but hopefully you get the idea. But to reiterate, the better you make your selection, the better your result will be.

CLICK HERE to access the PDF tutorial file.

If you found this tutorial helpful, please star-rate it here and share it with your friends on social media. Also, do not hesitate to add your questions, alternate techniques, and tips, as well as your examples to the comments here.

Until next time…

Advertisements

Rescaling vs. Re-Sampling Photos and Why it Matters


The subject of resizing your photographs to make a high quality print or to share it online continues to be question that comes up in forums. Part of the confusion stems from the terminology itself. In this post/post, I will discuss the subject from the standpoint of scanning a negative or slide. First, Are a couple of comments about the terminology.

Resolution – Dots Per Inch

Resolution is generally referred to as either dots per inch (dpi) or pixels per inch (ppi). What can lead to confusion is that dpi is used to describe the resolution of a scanner. For example, a scanner that is capable of scanning 35 mm negatives may have a optical resolution of 3200 dpi or greater. The word optical here means there are no mathematics being used to artificially increase the resolution. For the best quality, you should scan at or below the optical resolution of the scanner.

Resolution – Pixels Per Inch

Referring to a scanned image, once you open the image in say, Photoshop Elements or Photoshop, the terminology changes. Now the same resolution is measured in and referred to pixels per inch (ppi). The resolution is the same as you scanned, the term just changes. For example, if a negative is scanned at 3200 dpi and then opened in PSE 15 using the Image > Resize > Image Size command, the dialog below is opened. The resolution of 3200 ppi is shown.

3200 ppi ex

Print Resolution – Dots per Inch

When describing the resolution of an inkjet printer, dots per inch or dpi is again used. However, at this point in the process, the term takes on a whole new and more literal meaning. Now it is used to describe how many drops of ink are placed on the paper per inch. It is one of the prime, but not only parameter that is used to describe how well the printer can reproduce the image. And, this number has nothing to do with the resolution of the image file (in pixels per inch) that was sent to the printer.

This tutorial is an exercise that will not only give you a better understanding of rescaling an image versus re-sampling it, but will also demonstrate the loss of quality that is a bi-product of up-sampling an image, or adding to the number of pixels that were not in the image when it was scanned.

To view or download the tutorial, click on the image below. I suggest you actually follow along with the tutorial using one of your own images.

Resampling Comparison

In this post and tutorial I have focused on resolution as it impacts the printing of your digital photographs. In a future post, I will cover the topic of how to properly size your photos for sharing them online.

If you found this tutorial to be helpful and would like to see other tutorials in the future, please give it a suitable star-rating and  share it with your friends.

Until next time..

 

Highlights of Lucy’s Pioneer League Track Finals Events


 

This post is somewhat of a change of pace for my blog.

The link below is to a video I made of the highlights of my granddaughter’s events from the Pioneer League Track Finals meet. Lucy is normally known for her soccer play as the goal keeper on her Beach Development Academy soccer team.

As it turns out, she is also on her West Torrance HS Freshmen/Sophomore track team. She did quite well as shown in the video.

Lucy’s Highlights – Pioneer League Track Finals

I edited the raw video footage using Adobe’s Premiere Elements 15.