The Evolution of Photoshop Elements: PSE 11 through PSE 2018

One of the recurring topics that routinely show up in Photoshop Elements forums and social media is what are differences between different versions of Elements, and is it worth upgrading. Whether it is worth it or not is certainly up to the individual, but having a idea of what each version adds (and on occasion removes) is the first step in making your decision.

Sometime ago I put together a table that compares the current version to an earlier one. The PDF file that is linked below is my latest version of the table. It compares PSE 11 through PSE 2018. Hopefully, it will of some help to those who have struggled with the question of whether or not to upgrade.

PSE Evolution

Let me know if you found this table helpful. Don’t forget to explore my blog for other helpful digital photography articles and tutorials.

Until next time…


Photoshop Elements 15 Folder View

In this tutorial we will cover the Folder View in PSE 15’s Organizer. This view can be extremely helpful if you want to do some disk storage housekeeping. Viewing the folder layout in this view and then reordering the files and folders can be done without risking the common mistake of disconnecting your images within your catalog. This is because you are working from within the Organizer and not an external program, such as Windows Explorer.

Also, those of you who have organized your file structure relying on folder names, will find this view to be very familar.

Click on the link below to display and access the PDF file.


If you find this tutorial helpful, please Rate, Like, or Share it with others using the applicable links on the page. I welcome any comments you may as well.

Thanks for stopping by, and see you next time.

Photoshop Elements 15 is Here!

As they have done for the last several years,  Adobe has announced their latest version of Photoshop Elements this morning, Photoshop Elements 15.

Photoshop Elements is arguably the top selling consumer photo organizing and editing program in the world. Its editor is based on the same engine as Photoshop CC, and includes several of the same capabilities as the industry standard program. They have been simplified to make it easier for the average or occasional user.

Its Organizer can do almost all of the photo management tasks that the powerful and popular Lightroom CC can, and like Lightroom CC, it is uses powerful database technology.

PSE 15 remains a boxed product not subscription-based like PS CC and LR CC.

As is generally the case, PSE 15 is an incremental improvement and expansion to PSE 14. But the new features and performance improvements may well be worth you upgrading, even if you already have PSE 14. If your version is anything older than that, it is probably time you upgrade.

Within the Organizer, the most exciting new features are focused on the new Search capability, which includes Smart Tags and a new easier to use search screen.  Internally, the Organizer’s performance has been improved, especially when using Facial Recognition.

Within the Editor, one of the new features is the ability to design your own custom frames and then save them for future use. This is certainly going to be very popular with digital scrap-bookers.

Here is the link to the Adobe announcement for Photoshop Elements 15.


Also, I made a short video slideshow that identifies some of the new features in Photoshop Elements. Its link is shown below.


In the coming weeks, I will be posting a series of tutorials and videos that will help you to come up to speed with Photoshop Elements 15. Many of them will be directly applicable to PSE 14, as well.

So check back often to see the latest posts. Better yet follow me on Facebook , Pinterest or subscribe to this blog to get an email when a new post is available. You can do that on the link on this page.

If you have questions or comments, please leave them below in the Comments section.

Until next time…


Use Content Aware Fill Instead of the Clone Stamp to Remove Unwanted Objects

I suspect many of us instinctively reach for the Clone Stamp tool, or possibly the Healing Brush or Spot Healing Brush in Photoshop Elements to remove unwanted objects from our photos.

However, using Content Aware Fill is generally much faster and often even does a better job than the traditional tools. In this Quick Video Tip, I demonstrate how to do just that in Photoshop Elements 14. Like any tool, it may not do a perfect job, and you may have to apply it a second time, or even one of the other tools to tidy up.

Click on the link below to watch the video.

CA Fill Video Title_edited-3

Please leave a comment and let me know how this works for you. If you find this video helpful, please click on the Like button. Thanks for watching.


How to Change an Edited RAW Image Back to Its Original Settings

One of the great advantages of shooting RAW images is that you can always return an edited image to how it was captured by your camera after you have edited it. In this quick video tip, we’ll demonstrate how to do that using the Adobe Camera RAW (ACR) editor in Photoshop Elements 14.

However, the steps are the same in earlier versions of Elements, as well as in Photoshop CC.

YouTube Title




Using the Folder View in Photoshop Elements

Using the Folder View in Photoshop Elements can really help you manage the physical locations where you store your pictures and videos. Using the commands within the Folder View, you can do disk housekeeping without leaving the Organizer. This helps you avoid breaking the Cardinal Rules for using the Organizer: Once the you have imported a picture into the Catalog, you must not move it, rename it, or delete it, unless you do it using the applicable command within the Organizer. Otherwise you will disconnect it in the Organizer.

Using the Folder View expands upon those commands you find under the Menu bar. The video below demonstrates its use.

If you found this helpful, and would like to see more videos, click on the Like button below as well as on YouTube.


Using Nik Collection’s Dfine 2

In my previous post, I relayed the news that Google had made the popular Photoshop plug-in, Nik Collection suite, available as a free download. I took them up on their offer, and have been exploring some of its modules. In this post I want to highlight the Dfine 2 noise removal component.

I started with an under exposed RAW photo taken at night. I had my camera set on an ISO of 16,000, but even then I had to bring up the exposure in the Adobe Camera RAW editor. I then opened the image in Photoshop Elements 14. The Nik Collection works nicely with PSE. You access the various modules using the Filter menu in the Expert mode of Elements.

PSE Accessing Nik

The only processing I did within the Editor was to apply the Dfine 2 using its default Automatic Profile settings. The results are shown below  at 100%.

Dfine 2 After Before

I may have been able to get similar results using the Noise Reduction Filter in PSE 14, but I know from experience, it would have been much more work. I am also pretty sure that tweaking the settings of Dfine 2 would have also produced better results.

Have any of you tried the Nik package yet? What do you think? I’ll report back on other  modules in the suite as I further explore them. Stay tuned.