A New 360 Panorama Example


In my last post, I discussed a 360-degree panorama that I used http://www.jkuula.co to display. In this post, I went a bit further in complexity and used Microsoft’s Image Composite Editor (ICE) to stitch the 34 photos making up the panorama. The steps were basically these.

  1. The images were taken with my DJI Mavic Pro using its automatic Spherical Pan flight mode.
  2. Then each of 34 DNG images were edited in PS CC to improve their brightness/contrast and color with identical settings for each image.
  3. Than the edited images were saved as JPEG files and imported into ICE for stitching to create a spherical projection 6000 pixels wide.
  4. PS CC was used to add additional sky to top of the stitched panorama to get 6000×3000 image. The 2:1 ratio is required by Facebook in order for it to project the final image.  Other projection sites may not have this requirement.
  5. The composite was then converted to a 3D image in PS CC and saved.

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Here is the link to the Panorama as displayed using Kuula.co.

I like the workflow highlighted above, because it allows me to make any desired adjustments to the DNG (RAW) images prior compositing.

Until next time…

 

 

 

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A 3D Panorama Starting with a Video


In my last post, I outlined the steps to make a 3D panorama starting with a series of overlapping single image files. As pointed out in that post, it requires several steps after you have captured the images.

In this post, I link to a 3D panorama that started as a video that I shot while simply rotating my DJI Phantom through 360-degrees.

Shooting the video is much easier, because I do not have to worry about properly overlapping the images to be stitched. ICE handles that for me.

Of course the tradeoff is the quality or how closely you can zoom in when viewing the panorama is not as good as when the panorama is based on still images. That is because video files, even 4K videos, are no match for the still images produced by digital cameras, or even many smartphones.

Here is the link to the panorama.

photosynth-screen

It is not nearly as sharp and clear as those produced from still images. My Phantom 2 only shots HD video. New models shoot full 4K video which would significantly improve the results.

Another 3D Aerial Panorama – How I did It


In my previous post, I linked to a 3D panorama I had shot from my DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ drone. In this post, I am linking to a video that demonstrates how I did it. It was a multi-step process, but producing the 3D panorama only uses a couple of free Microsoft programs, which are easy to use they way I did.

By the way, my example uses a sequence of six shots that I took from my Phantom, but they could have just as easily been shot from my hand-held camera. The YouTube video does not include audio annotation to show just how easy it is to create the 3D panorama. Click on the image below to watch the demo.

ICE and Photosynth title

The panorama was shot from above yet another huge soccer complex across the street from the Silverlakes Soccer Complex in Norco/Eastvale CA. Silverlakes can be seen towards the end of the video.

2-27-17: Please note, Microsoft has removed Photosynth, so the link referred to here is no longer valid. They have provided a Photosynth Viewer, as of right now, I not determined an effective method to link the viewer with my downloaded .pano files.

I am currently reviewing alternate ways to produce and display 3D or VR panoramas. Please stay tuned.

Click on the link below to see the final 3D panorama. Using the scroll wheel on the mouse, zoom in and pan around. There is a tremendous amount of detail captured in the photo.

Silverlakes Pan Link

Please let me know in the comments below if you have used these two programs to produce your own 3D panoramas. How did they work for you? There are other programs available that can produce similar and often superior results. Have you used them?

Finally, please click on the Like and share this post with others if you think it has been helpful.

Microsoft’s ICE 2.0 Released


Microsoft recently released Version 2 of their Image Composite Editor produced by their Research Labs. It free and fun to play with.

Here is my first attempt at using this new version, which I uploaded to their Photosynth site for viewing. The file started with six photos I shot with my iPhone.

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Use the controls to zoom around the composite image.