Creating a New Catalog in Lightroom Classic CC


I basically started off this recent series of posts dealing with Lightroom Classic CC describing how I prepared for and then imported my Catalog from Photoshop Elements 2019. In this post, I cover how to make a Lightroom Catalog from scratch. Even if you have a Lightroom Catalog already, you may want to create a small one that you can use to test new features as they are introduced into Lightroom without running the risk of damaging your primary Catalog.

File New Catalog

As you will see, there are two main ways to create a new Catalog. Click on the link below to view or print the tutorial itself.

HOW TO CREATE A NEW CATALOG IN LIGHTROOM CLASSIC CC

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Until next time…

 

 

Brief Overview of Lightroom Classic’s Workspace


In the previous posts, I have introduced the general aspects of Lightroom Classic CC. The attached tutorial to this post, continues and essential completes the macro view of the program. It addresses the various workspaces or modules of the program, concentrating on the Library module, which is where most users begin their work. Once this is done, I will begin with tips on actually doing work in Lightroom.

Remember, I started this series of tutorials and demonstrations as a window into my efforts in converting my Photoshop Elements 2019 Catalog to Lightroom to manage my photo collection.  Below is the link to the PDF file that describes the workspaces and their layout.

Lightroom Classic CC Workspaces

If you found this tutorial to be helpful, please give it a Like and Share it using the buttons at the bottom. Also, I welcome any comments and suggestions you have.

Until next time…

Setting Lightroom Classic CC Preferences


Soon after you create a new Catalog in Lightroom CC Classic, you need to address how you want to work. To do this you need to take a look at the preferences that are available. The problem is you may not know enough about Lightroom at this point to feel comfortable about setting its preferences. Don’t worry. Sticking with the defaults will not get you into trouble, and they can easily be changed at any time. In the AppTip Sheets of this post, I will address the most important settings.

There two main preferences commands, Catalog Settings, and Preferences. In this post, I will address both of these. Both are accessed from Edit on the Menu Bar.

The AppTip Sheet linked below deals with the Catalog Settings.

Catalog Settings

The other AppTip Sheet covers the Preferences options.

Preferences

I hope you found these tutorials helpful. If you did please click on the Like button, and Share buttons. Thanks for dropping by.

Until next time…

What is Lightroom CC Classic Anyway?


In my initial post, I stated that I was switching my image/video media management from Photoshop Elements, specifically its Organizer to Lightroom CC Classic. In the attached AppTip Sheet, I explained how I prepared for migrating my PSE 2019 Catalog to Lightroom CC Classic, going on to describe the actual importing of the Catalog.

Before going any further in this series, I will very briefly describe what Lightroom CC Classic is all about. Please click on the link below.

LR Logo

Next time, we will get started in actually working with Lightroom CC Classic. In this series, we will first go over what we need to know about working with the Library module, Lightroom’s equivalent and superior sister to PSE 2019’s Organizer. Then we will move on to the Develop and other modules making up the program.

Until then…

 

I am Changing My Photo Manage From Photoshop Elments to Lightroom CC Classic


I have been using the Organizer in Photoshop Elements to manage my photos and videos since Adobe first combined it with Photoshop Elements 2 to create Photoshop Elements 3 (PSE 3). It has served me well.

Adobe has routinely updated the program annually to incrementally add new capabilities and features. I have installed each new version. Over the years I have created and maintained multiple Catalogs for a variety of reasons. All my photos and more recent videos are contained in two main Catalogs, that together have over 60,000 items. I have other special Catalogs primarily for videos. I even have a Catalog devoted to managing my large collection of MP3 audio recordings.

However, I have decided to move on to a workflow that uses Lightroom CC Classic for media management and basic editing, and Photoshop CC for more involved editing. I have used both programs for several years as well, but not as my primary software. It is not that PSE no longer works for me. It is just that I want to expand my horizons a bit.

As I transition from Elements to Lightroom, I will add a series of demos and tutorials that will hopefully help others make the transition and learn the basics of Lightroom CC Classic. I will continue to post new Photoshop Elements tutorials from time to time, as topics come up that interest me and might help others.

In this first AppTip Sheet, I will describe the steps I have taken to convert my PSE Catalogs to Lightroom CC Classic. It begins with preparing your Photoshop Elements 2019 Organizer for migration. The steps are also comatible with early versions of Elements.

In the tutorial that is linked below, I will be using my PSE 2019 Catalog that essentially contains all the photos/videos shot before 2015 as the example.  The name of the Catalog is “PSE 2019 Fixed Prime Photos 7-3-14”. This Catalog has 46932 total items.

  • 45,522 Photos
  • 1,137 Videos
  • 98 Audio Files
  • 175 PSE Projects

The vast majority of the media are on a Drobo, Drive O. But as shown in the left column in the figure below, they are scattered all over my PC on various internal and external drives. 

Click Here to view or download the tutorial PDF.

Until next time…

Adobe Makes Major Announcements on Lightroom and Photoshop


Yesterday, Adobe held their usual annual event in Las Vegas, Adobe Max where generally they make product announcements. During the event, they announced major upgrades to Lightroom and Photoshop CC. This comes after announcing Photoshop Elements 2018 and Premiere Elements 2018 a couple of weeks ago.

The big news yesterday was the renaming of Lightroom, to be called Lightroom Classic CC, and a new cloud-based version called Lightroom CC. I have been beta testing these two programs for the last several months.

As you may know already, photography websites and group forums are filled with the news and information about the new features added to all three programs. Normally, my blog posts concentrate on my personal observations and tips. However, there has been so many quality articles published yesterday, I am going to concentrate on providing links to three I found very helpful, which were written by the real experts. There are many more out there, and I am sure many more will be coming in the weeks and months ahead. This is a very exciting time for Photoshop CC and Lightroom users.

This article does a good job explaining the name changes and new versions of Lightroom. It is by Victoria Bampton, who is a well known expert and author of books dealing with Lightroom.

http://mailchi.mp/lightroomqueen/the-future-of-lightroom?e=ab0bb0ecfd

Likewise, Laura Shoe is another Lightroom expert who has written several books and authored courses. In her web post linked below, she also covers the pricing for the programs.

https://laurashoe.com/2017/10/18/whats-new-in-the-lightroom-world-huge-announcements-at-adobe-max-read-this-summary/

Colin Smith, of Photoshop Café, is both a Lightroom and Photoshop expert who writes extensively and has multiple videos describing how to use these programs. I have several of his videos. He also flies a drone, and has produced several videos on using it to create great photos and videos. I have taken advantages of these to improve my own drone photography. Here he explains the new features added to Photoshop CC, and Lightroom.

http://photoshopcafe.com/new_features_Photoshop_CC_2018?mc_cid=896b8fea75&mc_eid=dbe0d5fb0b

As you know my prime digital photography activity is with using Photoshop Elements and Premiere Elements. However, I do use Photoshop CC and Lightroom. I am getting closer to adapting my basic workflow and software to theses latter programs. yesterday’s announcements are moving me closer to that. How about you?

Look for more coverage on both Lightroom and Photoshop in the future.

Until next time.

Working with Catalogs in Both Photoshop Elements and Lightroom


In Photoshop Elements

PSE Organizer

If you have used the Organizer in Photoshop Elements to manage your photos, you undoubtedly know the Cardinal Rules that you must not disobey if you want to avoid serious heartaches and frustration.

The rules are:

Once a photo has been imported into the Catalog…

Do not Delete the photo,

Do not Move the photo,

Do not Rename the photo,

Unless you use the applicable commands in Photoshop Elements. The same basic rules hold for the folders in which the photos are stored.

Remember, the Organizer’s Catalog is like a card catalog in a library. It does not contain the books. It only contains information about the books, including on what shelf the book is contained.

The PSE commands to move and rename photos are in the sub-menu under File.

 PSE File Sub-Menu

 To see comparable commands to modify folders, do the following:

  1. Open the left panel, by clicking on the Show Panel in the lower left corner of the screen.
  2. Click on Folders at the top of the panel.
  3. Click on the parallel lines button and then select View as Tree.
  4. Scroll to find the folder you want to modify, and then right click on it.
  5. Select the task you want to perform and follow the screen prompts.

PSE Folder View

You can also drag and drop folders to move them in this view, but I prefer to not to. It is too easy for me to move them to the wrong place.

In Lightroom

 LR Library Module

I suspect many of you who started out using Photoshop Elements to organize and edit your photos may be thinking about moving on to Lightroom, or have recently done so. There are many reasons to do that, not the least of which is you can rent Lightroom CC and Photoshop CC from Adobe for $10 per month!

The Catalog used in the Library module of Lightroom is essentially the same as the Catalog in Elements. That is, they are both databases. They do not contain the actual photos, only previews of them, with pointers to where the physical files are stored.

Because Lightroom was designed for professional photographers, it is more robust than the Organizer in Photoshop Elements and consequently somewhat harder to use. There are a multitude of websites and blogs that cover using Lightroom. One of the many Lightroom experts is Victoria Bampton.

Below is a sampling of her articles that discuss similar topics in using Lightroom. As you can see the tasks are a bit more complicated.

How do I move only my photos to another hard drive, leaving the catalog where it is?

How do I find and move or rename my catalog?

 Which Lightroom files do I need to back up?

In future posts, I will cover using Lightroom in much more detail, but hopefully the above articles will get you started on the right foot.

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