A New 360 Panorama Example


In my last post, I discussed a 360-degree panorama that I used http://www.jkuula.co to display. In this post, I went a bit further in complexity and used Microsoft’s Image Composite Editor (ICE) to stitch the 34 photos making up the panorama. The steps were basically these.

  1. The images were taken with my DJI Mavic Pro using its automatic Spherical Pan flight mode.
  2. Then each of 34 DNG images were edited in PS CC to improve their brightness/contrast and color with identical settings for each image.
  3. Than the edited images were saved as JPEG files and imported into ICE for stitching to create a spherical projection 6000 pixels wide.
  4. PS CC was used to add additional sky to top of the stitched panorama to get 6000×3000 image. The 2:1 ratio is required by Facebook in order for it to project the final image.  Other projection sites may not have this requirement.
  5. The composite was then converted to a 3D image in PS CC and saved.

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Here is the link to the Panorama as displayed using Kuula.co.

I like the workflow highlighted above, because it allows me to make any desired adjustments to the DNG (RAW) images prior compositing.

Until next time…

 

 

 

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Using Okolo.com to Display Mavic 360 Panoramas


In my previous post I should 360 panoramas or panospheres that were shot with my DJI Mavic Pro drone. In this post I will general describe the process using projects generated by http://www.okolo.com.

Remeber, Kuula.co works with pictures that have already been stitched, whereas okolo.com requires the individual images taken by the Mavic to be uploaded. Okolo.com then stitches them and prepares the panospheric projection.

Any photo editing that is desired must first be done to each individual image. In the case of the Mavic Pro 360 Panoramas, that means 34 separate images. Additionally, Okolo.com, only accepts JPEG images.

Even though the Mavic takes both a JPEG and DNG (RAW) images, I generally use the DNG version to hopefully gain the best quality.  Each of the 34 images are 12 megapixels.

The basic steps I used to produce the 360 panorama linked below were to:

  1. Upload the images from the Mavic’s memory card.
  2. Import the thirty-four DNG images into Photoshop CC 2019.
  3. Edit each one with the same settings for color, brightness and contrast.
  4. Save the edited version as a JPEG image required by Okolo.com.
  5. Upload the batch of images to Okolo.com.
  6. Use Okolo.com to create and project the panosphere.

Click Here to view the final panospere on okolo.com. Below is a screen shot from the projection.

Freedom Bell okolo screen shot

So to summarize, I use Kuula.co if I want to quickly project an display a previously stitched set of images as a panosphere. I use okolo.com to start with the individual images and thereby potentially getting a better quality result.

However, there other stitching and projecting panosphere programs and websites I am experimenting with. I will describe those in future posts.

Until next time…

Editing Video in Photoshop ACR Revisited – Once Again


Colin Smith of Photoshop Café recently described how to edit and color grade video in Photoshop CC.

The steps on color grading were new to me, but it turns out I had posted two articles sometime ago on how to edit video using ACR in Photoshop.

The first one was in 2014. I am not sure where I leaned how to do this, but it could have been from Colin Smith. Here is its link:

https://don26812.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/use-adobe-camera-raw-to-edit-video/

I revisited the subject in December 2016. This time my before and after comparison was better. Here is the link to this one.

https://don26812.wordpress.com/2016/12/16/revisiting-processing-video-using-adobe-camera-raw-acr-in-photoshop/

In the Colin Smith’s recent video, he goes on to how to use ACR to color grade a video, and give it a cinematic effect with is popular. Personally, I do not like the look for most of my videos.

By the way, I find that Photoshop renders the video much more slowly than say Premiere Elements 2019, at least on my PC. But I can live with that, because I am much more comfortable using the sliders of the ACR.

After all this time, I am curious to see if others use this technique to edit their videos.

And finally, there are a lot of other things you can do to enhance your videos using Photoshop CC, like trimming, and adding transitions.

Until next time…

What is Lightroom CC Classic Anyway?


In my initial post, I stated that I was switching my image/video media management from Photoshop Elements, specifically its Organizer to Lightroom CC Classic. In the attached AppTip Sheet, I explained how I prepared for migrating my PSE 2019 Catalog to Lightroom CC Classic, going on to describe the actual importing of the Catalog.

Before going any further in this series, I will very briefly describe what Lightroom CC Classic is all about. Please click on the link below.

LR Logo

Next time, we will get started in actually working with Lightroom CC Classic. In this series, we will first go over what we need to know about working with the Library module, Lightroom’s equivalent and superior sister to PSE 2019’s Organizer. Then we will move on to the Develop and other modules making up the program.

Until then…

 

Maintaining and Protecting Your PSE 2019 Catalog


In this post I will highlight some tips for maintaining and protecting your PSE 2019 Catalog. They are contained in the AppTip Sheet that is linked below. Over the years I have presented tutorials on how to use the Backup/Restore commands that our built into PSE. Even though these tutorials were written for previous versions, the steps and screens are virtually the same in PSE 2019.  

Click on the link below to open the PDF file that describes how to protect and maintain your PSE 2019 Catalog.

Using the tips described in the AppTip Sheet will ensure that you spend your time doing the fun things that PSE 2019 allows, rather than troubleshooting problems with your Catalog.

Until next time…

Postscript to PSE 2019 Auto Creations Video


A couple of weeks ago, I posted a video on the new hub and Auto Creations feature. You can review that post here.

Here are a couple of things I did not emphasize, but should have. To begin with, Auto Creations uses AI to analyze your photos and videos to automatically identify and create slideshows, video & photo collages, or even just selecting/extracting some interesting images from your videos.

When it is activated, as described in the video, it works in the background to produce these creations, even if PSE 2019 is not running. It can create a maximum of 40 of these editable creations, and then stops. You can delete any or all of these creations or incorporate them into the Organizer. Once the number gets below forty, new Auto Creations are produced. If the Catalog has not changed with new imports, they may be repeats or similar creations previously generated.

Here is how I use this in my workflow. I generally turn off Auto Creations, since it appears to impact the performance of my PC. It may not have any impact  on yours. I review and either incorporate/edit the Auto Creations generated, or delete them. I can do this either with the Auto Creations on or off.

Now when I take a new set of photos perhaps from an event or just a photo shot, I import them into the Catalog, and then I turn Auto Creations on again. After a time, PSE 2019 has produced new creations from my recent imports. I even get a Notification on my desktop in Windows 10 telling me that new creations have been produced. I review the new creations and then turn Auto Creations off again. This process works well for me.

New ACs 12-21-18

I suspect that Adobe will enhance the Auto Creations feature in future versions of the program. I suspect one of those improvements will be to better identify the events and other information about the photos and videos selected for the creation.

If you found this and the original post helpful, please star-rate it and or share it with others. Thank you.

Until next time…

Using Photoshop CC to Prepare a Panosphere for Display on Okolo.com


Back in February, I posted an article how I use Okolo.com to display a panosphere. Okolo stitches the uploaded images into a 360-degree panorama or panosphere. In this post, I expand a bit on the earlier one. Okolo does not accept RAW images, which I prefer to take when using its panorama shooting modes. It only accepts JPEG images, and they can only be 5 Mb in size. So other software must be used to edit the RAW images, and then convert and resize them.

This post illustrates my workflow for preparing the 34 RAW images my DJI Mavic Pro takes using Photoshop CC. It goes no to outline the steps to upload them to Okolo.com to create and display the panosphere. I have detailed the steps in the PDF file that is linked below.

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Using PS CC and Okolo to Display 360 Panosphere

The workflow I describe here uses PS CC Action that does the necessary steps to convert and resize each image automatically. It is a simple action, and for the purposes of this post, I have not covered how to write it.

Finally, this can also be done in Photoshop Elements. I will probably write another post soon to better illustrate how to do it with the capabilities that are in Elements. Stay tuned.

If you found this tutorial to be helpful, please star-rate and Like it. And of course, any and all comments are welcome.